Bay Area Health Equity Speaker Series On-Demand

  • Register
    • Non-member - Free!
    • ACCMA Member - Free!
    • MIEC Policyholders - Free!
    • NSMS Member - Free!
Recorded May 18 - June 15, 2021

The Bay Area Medical Societies and the Ethnic Health Institute (EHI) is collaboratively offering a unique experience addressing the connection between socioeconomic factors, systemic inequality, and health disparities in our community.  Including thought provoking keynote speakers with a deep focus on understanding how inequality is linked to health care  disparities and identify what health disparities look like locally. Participants will gain ability to reference local resources in practice  and highlight examples of effective strategies to improve patient outcomes.

Listen in! Five Weeks of Speakers Available On-Demand:
May 18, 2021   Keynote Speaker: Linkage Between Social Inequality and Health Disparities 
May 25, 2021   Keynote Speaker: Health Inequity in Our Own Backyard 
June 1, 2021   Community Resilience Case Study: Physician Leaders of the African American Response Circle (AARC)
June 8, 2021   A Strategic Approach Case Study: Actions Taken By a Large Medical Group
June 15, 2021   Leadership in Action Case Study: Kedren Community Health Center
Learning Objectives
  • Understand the linkage between inequity and health disparities.
  • Identify specific demographics of the Bay Area affected by health equity.
  • Gain an understanding the health impacts of the social determinants of health
  • Gain an understanding of the effects of health equity on racial and ethnic minority groups.
  • Discuss the role of economic opportunity on individual health and on community health
  • Gain the ability to reference resources in practice and highlight examples of effective strategies to improve patient outcomes.
  • Identify gaps in policies contributing to health disparities.

For questions or assistance on registration, contact Jenn Mullins, ACCMA Education and Event Association at jmullins@accma.org or call 510-654-5383.

  • Linkage Between Social Inequity and Health Disparities

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Recorded Tuesday, May 18, 2021

    Join in on the first session of five in the Bay Area Health Equity Virtual Series.

    Dr. Manchanda has spent more than a decade developing novel strategies to improve health in resource-poor communities. In this presentation, he examines the connections among socioeconomic factors, systemic inequality, and health disparities. Socioeconomic factors that may not seem directly related to health outcomes are in fact closely related through systems that promote unequal treatment and thus lead to disparate outcomes.

    Rishi Manchanda, MD, MPH

    CEO & President, HealthBegins

    Dr. Rishi Manchanda is President & CEO of HealthBegins, amission-driven consulting and technology firm that helps healthcare andcommunity partners improve care and the social factors that make people sick inthe first place. Client-partners include the American Hospital Association, theCMS Accountable Health Communities model, and health plans and health systemsacross the country. Dr. Manchanda serves on the board of the Beyond FlexnerAlliance, on the California Future Health Workforce Commission, and was amember of the HHS Health Care Payment Learning & Action Network’s PrimaryCare Payment Model Work Group.

    Dr. Manchanda’s career is marked by a commitment to improvingcare and social determinants of health for vulnerable populations. He served asdirector of social medicine for a network of community health centers in southcentral Los Angeles, was the lead physician for homeless Veterans at theGreater Los Angeles VA, and was the first chief medical officer for a self-insuredemployer with a large rural immigrant workforce. In his 2013 TEDbook, The UpstreamDoctors, he introduced a new model of healthcare workers - the Upstreamists -who improve care and equity by addressing patients' social needs, like food,financial and housing insecurity. The book has become recommended reading inmedical schools and universities across the world.

  • Health Inequality in Our Own Backyard

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    This session will complement the opening keynote by looking at how the connection between systemic inequality and health outcomes impacts our patients in the East Bay. We will address the widening gap of wealth in the Bay Area and effect it has on health outcomes of specific demographics in our community. This data driven talk will provide a view of what our own backyard looks like and how the resources are distributed causing health outcomes to decline in some areas where they thrive in others.

    Recorded Tuesday, May 25, 2021 

    This session will complement the opening keynote by looking at how the connection between systemic inequality and health outcomes impacts our patients in the East Bay. We will address the widening gap of wealth in the Bay Area and effect it has on health outcomes of specific demographics in our community. This data driven talk will provide a view of what our own backyard looks like and how the resources are distributed causing health outcomes to decline in some areas where they thrive in others.

    Anothony Iton, M.D., J.D., MPH

    Senior Vice President, Healthy Communities, The California Endowment

    Anthony Iton, M.D., J.D., MPH is Senior Vice President for Healthy Communities at The California Endowment, a private, statewide health foundation whose mission is to expand access to affordable, quality health care for underserved individuals and communities, and to promote fundamental improvements in the health status of all Californians. Dr. Iton oversees the the implementation of Building Healthy Communities (BHC), the foundation’s 10 year, billion dollar, 14 site, multi-sectoral, place-based initiative designed to improve health status of 1 million low income Californians. Prior to that Dr. Iton served for seven years as the Alameda County Health Officer and subsequently Public Health Director where he oversaw an agency with a focus on preventing communicable disease outbreaks, reducing the burden of chronic disease and obesity, and managing the county’s preparedness for biological terrorism.

    Dr. Iton’s primary interest is the health of disadvantaged populations and the contributions of race, class, wealth, education, geography, and employment to health status. He has asserted that in every public health area of endeavor, be it immunizations, chronic disease, HIV/AIDS, STDs, obesity, or even disaster preparedness, public health practitioners must recognize that they are confronted with the enduring consequences of structural poverty, institutional racism and other forms of systemic injustice. He further asserts that the only sustainable approach to eliminating health inequities is through the design of intensive, multi-sectoral, place-based interventions that are specifically designed to identify existing assets and build social, political and economic power among a critical mass of community residents in historically under-resourced communities.

    Dr. Iton received his medical degree at Johns Hopkins Medical School and subsequently trained in internal medicine and preventive medicine at New York Hospital, Yale, and Berkeley and received board certification in both specialties. Dr. Iton also received a law degree and a Master’s of Public Health from the University of California, Berkeley and is a member of the California Bar. He has worked as an HIV disability rights attorney at the Berkeley Community Law Center, a health care policy analyst with Consumer Reports, and as a physician and advocate for the homeless at the San Francisco Public Health Department.

    Dr. Iton’s work has been featured in several national and international documentaries including Unnatural Causes: Is Inequality Making Us Sick? (PBS 2009), Roots of Health (PBS 2010), Designing Healthy Communities (PBS 2011), and The Weight of The Nation (HBO 2012). Awards include the prestigious Milton and Ruth Roemer Prize for Creative Public Health Work (2006), awarded by the American Public Health Association to a US local health official in recognition of outstanding creative and innovative public health work.  In February 2010, Dr. Iton was recognized by the California Legislative Black Caucus with the Black History Month Legends Award and presented on the floor of the California State Assembly with a resolution memorializing his life's work and achievements. He has also been awarded Physicians For Social Responsibility Los Angeles Founders Award 2012, and UC Berkeley School of Public Health Alumnus of the Year 2011. In 2014, Dr. Iton received the Beverlee Myers Award from the California Department of Public Health for Excellence and Leadership in Public Health. In May of 2014 he provided the commencement address to the UC Berkeley School of Public Health.

    He serves on the board of directors of Consumer Reports, Jobs For The Future, the Centers For Disease Control Directors Advisory Committee, and Grantmakers in Health. 

  • Community Resilience Case Study: Physician Leaders of the African-American Response Circle

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Leaders of the African-American Response Circle (AARC) will join us in a panel to discuss the political, cultural, and socioeconomic factors that led to exacerbations of health disparities in the African-American community during the COVID-19 pandemic. In their discussion they will identify leveraging points that can help mobilize resources for supporting community resilience. Additionally, they will describe the critical ingredients for a successful community-based alliance that bridges healthcare delivery with other sectors such as public health, educational, and religious institutions.

    Recorded Tuesday, June 1, 2021 

    Leaders of the African-American Response Circle (AARC) will join us in a panel to discuss the political, cultural, and socioeconomic factors that led to exacerbations of health disparities in the African-American community during the COVID-19 pandemic. In their discussion they will identify leveraging points that can help mobilize resources for supporting community resilience. Additionally, they will describe the critical ingredients for a successful community-based alliance that bridges healthcare delivery with other sectors such as public health, educational, and religious institutions. 

    Katrina Peters, MD, MPH

    Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at UCSF (Facilitator)

    Noha Aboelata, MD

    Founder and CEO of Roots Community Health Center

    Damon Francis, MD

    Chief Medical Officer, Health Leads

    Kimberly Rhoads, MD, MPH

    Associate Professor of Epidemiology & Bio statistics, UCSF

  • A Systems Approach Case Study: The Permanente Medical Group

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    The Permanente Medical Group (TPMG) is taking a strategic approach to health equity that includes a focus on People, Patients and Community. During this panel discussion, we will hear about how TPMG is approaching health equity and dive into some of the specific areas and initiatives that are underway to move the dial towards equity. Attendees should leave this session with a better understanding to some of the elements and considerations that go into a systems approach to health equity.

    Recorded Tuesday, June 8, 2021

    The Permanente Medical Group (TPMG) is taking a strategic approach to health equity that includes a focus on People, Patients and Community. During this panel discussion, we will hear about how TPMG is approaching health equity and dive into some of the specific areas and initiatives that are underway to move the dial towards equity. Attendees should leave this session with a better understanding to some of the elements and considerations that go into a systems approach to health equity.

    Stacey Hunt, MD

    The Permanente Medical Group

  • Leadership in Action Case Study: Kedren Community Health Center

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Join us in the final session of the series, and learn how a South Los Angeles health center became the model of success for vaccine distribution. Examine the contributions within a community organization specifically, the partnerships made to remove barriers to getting vaccines to underserved communities. Lastly, hear the positive, and uplifting atmosphere they spread to be part of the solution during the pandemic.

    Recorded Tuesday, June 15, 2021 

    Join us in the final session of the series, and learn how a South Los Angeles health center became the model of success for vaccine distribution. Examine the contributions within a community organization specifically, the partnerships made to remove barriers to getting vaccines to underserved communities. Lastly, hear the positive, and uplifting atmosphere they spread to be part of the solution during the pandemic.

    Jerry Abraham, MD, MPH, CMQ

    Director, Kedren Community Health Center